Tag Archives: Blogs

Is blogging dead? Or just this one…

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My appetite for consuming blogs has seriously waned.  Seriously. It’s a rare occasion that read a blog post from headline to comment line. I usually scan a headline, and maybe click on a link if it teases my taste buds but I generally just take a quick bite and move on.

Although when I do come across an interesting one, I dive right in and come out on the other end as satisfied as if I’d just consumed a giant slice of chocolate cake and a large glass of spicy red. I found this one ‘A teenager’s view on Social Media; written by an actual teen’ was a pretty good read, even worth a second helping.

Conversely, it seems I’ve not been cooking up many new blog posts either, and it seems I’m not the only one. Have you noticed? It’s been nearly a year since MP’s  last article – and we have a multi-national team of bloggers. Where did we all go?

Priya Florence on WPeka says “As long as there are readers, there will be bloggers.” So Media Platypus readers – are you there? Do you still have midnight cravings for another missive from the Media Platypus team?

In my head I hear your faint echo of a reply… (I have a very vivid imagination).

quote on wellington waterfront.

But I’d rather have your comments. Yes this blog has been a little less than “best practice” lately. But I know for a fact that social media is still high on many an interpreter’s list of something that want guidance and help on.  And the ethos for 2016 in ‘blogging’ circles is to publish long content less often – quality over quantity.

Huffington Post says;

“… to build a successful blog you just need to become a curator of information for a specific community. What you need to do is, focus on a niche audience, discover their needs and give them valuable information and services.”

But enough about what Huffington P says. What should Media Platypus say?

Our niche audience is interpreters. You are our audience.

Our content focus is social media. So we’d like you tell us a bit more about what you want to know.

What information would you like from us?

  • Case studies?
  • Ideas or opinions?
  • Innovations in technology or evolutions in new media?
  • How to 101?
  • The basics or the latest trends?
  • How to use hashtags? (#lotsofquestions).
  • My new favourite recipe for chocolate cake?

Tell us in the comments, or on the Media Platypus Facebook page. Let’s get some great conversations happening. Then we’ll come up with a plan for action for the coming year.

Food poster.

Oh and by the way, if you want to know who we are, you can find out more here

Keeping Comments in Your Sights (I mean “Sites”)

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Who knew that Big Bird would become a major campaign issue? (image from www.mashable.com)

 

The internet is ablaze, my friends. Who knew that the mere mention of Big Bird, binders full of women, and now bayonets during the U.S. presidential debates would stimulate such heated discussion? As a Canadian, I’m a little jealous. Even our top Canadian comedians sent to the United States to subversively work for U.S. network television couldn’t make this stuff up.

Clearly, these statements are having an impact. Related blogs are filling the internet with record numbers of comments, the media is frothing at the mouth, and even Big Bird is tweeting.

I could only dream of having this level of discussion after one of my posts. But, instead, after I write a post and publish it, I sit back and wait for throngs of people to quickly comment on my brilliance. But, nothing happens. Well, that’s not true. Paul normally writes something within a day or two.

So, I had to think long and hard. I pondered. I stood outside in the rain and looked up to the sky for a sign. And then, I decided to just write down some basic tips for attracting comments to blog posts. I’m going to share these tips with you and even follow them in this post, and we’ll see if I make any progress.

How to attract comments to your posts (and how I followed my own advice in this post):

  1. Be topical. (I mentioned the U.S. Presidential debates.)
  2. Be provocative. (Notice the clever Canadian comment and hilarious fake campaign poster?)
  3. Build a community. (We are working on it – we have over 300 Facebook likes and our blog is viewed from around the world.)
  4. Respond and nurture commentators. (Try it. Comment and I’ll comment back.)
  5. Ask questions. (Phil asked a question last week and got a couple of bites. I’m about to ask one this week and, hopefully, many of you will comment.)
  6. Post at a good time. (That’s why we are now posting on Wednesdays every week!)

So, I want to ask all of you wonderful people that make up our community: What do we call our Media Platypus fans? Personally, I vote for “Platypuses.” Which poses an interesting question – are you a “platypuses” or “platypi” type of person (think of octipuses vs. Octipi)? Discuss…

 

Our fans are cute, too! (image from www.tezini.com)